For 30-somethings, stakes are high over future of DACA

For 30-somethings, stakes are high over future of DACA

Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and his brother, John Diaz, 7, watch videos as their parents, Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)
From left; Humberto Diaz, John Diaz, 7, Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and Karina Ruiz eat dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Karina Ruiz prepares dinner at her home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
Karina Ruiz serves dinner at her home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)

For 30-somethings, stakes are high over future of DACA

Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and his brother, John Diaz, 7, watch videos as their parents, Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Sept. 30, 2019 photo, Andreas Magnusson, a music producer who has been in the US for over 30 years, poses in his studio in Richmond, Va. Magnusson is among the oldest immigrants enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He came to the U.S. from Sweden when he was a toddler. His mother had a student visa and eventually found an employer who was sponsoring the two, but an immigration lawyer botched their case, and Magnusson, already an adult with a growing business, a home and a car, was left without legal status. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Karina Ruiz and Humberto Diaz prepare dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)
From left; Humberto Diaz, John Diaz, 7, Joseph Diaz, 10, right, and Karina Ruiz eat dinner at their home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Karina Ruiz prepares dinner at her home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA.(AP Photo/Matt York)
Karina Ruiz serves dinner at her home, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019 in Glendale, Ariz. Karina is in a program dating back to the Obama administration that allows immigrants brought here as children to work and protects them from deportation. The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday, Nov. 12, about President Donald Trump’s attempt to end the program, and the stakes are particularly high for the older generation of people enrolled in Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. (AP Photo/Matt York)
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