Royal Botanic Garden seeks respect for world's fungus

Royal Botanic Garden seeks respect for world's fungus

Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Laura Martinez-Suz examines the Calvatia Gigantea fungus, one of the biggest once also called puffball, at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Ester Gaya holds the earth star fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Laura Martinez-Suz examines the Calvatia Gigantea fungus, one of the biggest once also called puffball, at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

Royal Botanic Garden seeks respect for world's fungus

Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Laura Martinez-Suz examines the Calvatia Gigantea fungus, one of the biggest once also called puffball, at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Ester Gaya holds the earth star fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Scientist Laura Martinez-Suz examines the Calvatia Gigantea fungus, one of the biggest once also called puffball, at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Kew's first ever State of the World's Fungi report, is the first of its kind outlining the global state of fungi, reveals how important fungi are to all life on Earth. From those that cause havoc, to those that can heal and provide security to communities across the world, it presents the major issues affecting their diversity and abundance. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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