Brazil's da Silva names successor, but will voters follow?

Brazil's da Silva names successor, but will voters follow?

Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad, center, and his running-mate Manuela d'Avila, right, hold a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad waves to the crowd during a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
A supporter holds a mask in the likeness of the Brazil's jailed former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, during a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where da Silva is in prison for corruption, in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil's Workers' Party replaced da Silva with Fernando Haddad as its presidential candidate for October's general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America's largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad holds a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad, left, and his running-mate Manuela d'Avila hold a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Brazil's da Silva names successor, but will voters follow?

Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad, center, and his running-mate Manuela d'Avila, right, hold a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad waves to the crowd during a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
A supporter holds a mask in the likeness of the Brazil's jailed former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, during a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where da Silva is in prison for corruption, in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil's Workers' Party replaced da Silva with Fernando Haddad as its presidential candidate for October's general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America's largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad holds a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Workers' Party presidential candidate Fernando Haddad, left, and his running-mate Manuela d'Avila hold a campaign rally outside federal police headquarters where former President Luiz inacio Lula da Silva is in jail for corruption in Curitiba, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Brazil’s Workers’ Party replaced da Silva with Haddad as its candidate for October’s general election, clarifying one of the biggest question marks hanging over the vote to lead Latin America’s largest nation. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
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